Inside a Contemporary Luxury Family Home Designed by Elizabeth Roberts

Inside a Contemporary Luxury Family Home Designed by Elizabeth Roberts ⇒ Athena and Victor Calderone have found their forever home in an amazing contemporary luxury townhouse in Cobble Hill, Brooklyn, decorated by Elizabeth Roberts. If you’re a fan of the contemporary luxury style, CovetED brings you inside this amazing home that will certainly inspire you for future projects. The contemporary luxury design is characterized by clean and crisp lines while working with exquisite materials and craftsmanship.

 


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Inside a Contemporary Luxury Family Home Designed by Elizabeth Roberts

Inside a Contemporary Luxury Family Home Designed by Elizabeth Roberts

 

For Athena and Victor Calderone, it was a true journey finding a place they could truly call home. But their journey brought them to a superb destination: a 25-foot-wide Greek Revival townhouse in historic Cobble Hill, Brooklyn. After meeting in 1996 and getting engaged in 1997, the couple has been through eight different houses until they settled on this incredible contemporary luxury family home.

 

Inside a Contemporary Luxury Family Home Designed by Elizabeth Roberts

Inside a Contemporary Luxury Family Home Designed by Elizabeth Roberts

The Cobble Hill place is the eighth home the couple have done together. “I’d reached a point in my confidence level where I didn’t want a developer choosing my bathroom fixtures and base mouldings,” Athena says. “I was like, ‘Come on, Vic, let’s do a townhouse.’ ” Victor, accustomed to the openness of loft living, thought townhouses were “dark and narrow.” He told his wife, “If we do it, it needs to be a wide one,” which, he adds, “made it really tough within our budget.”

 

Inside a Contemporary Luxury Family Home Designed by Elizabeth Roberts

 

Three years and a full gut renovation later, here they are. “This is our forever home,” they both insist. “It was a hell of a project,” says Athena. “It nearly broke us—financially and emotionally.” Because the townhouse had been converted into apartments, much of the history was wiped clean. “We salvaged what we could,” she says, pointing out the original mantels and an ornate medallion in the living room from which a handmade chandelier now hangs. They weren’t total purists, though. Speakers are set into the ceilings, and partitions between the living and dining rooms were demolished for a more open entertaining space.

 

Inside a Contemporary Luxury Family Home Designed by Elizabeth Roberts

 

The kitchen—Calacatta Paonazzo marble counters on chalky grey cabinetry with Parisian-style open shelving—is literally “the star of the show,” Athena says. “For shooting purposes, you need sidelight, so that’s why we ended up with a square island instead of a rectangle. It sounds crazy,” she concedes, “but I needed to make certain things work for my brand.” They also added a wall of bi-fold glass doors onto the terrace just beyond, creating a spectacular indoor/outdoor living experience seldom seen in New York City homes.

 

Inside a Contemporary Luxury Family Home Designed by Elizabeth Roberts

 

Upstairs, they devoted an entire floor to the master suite with double doors that lead from the bedroom to Athena’s walk-through closet to a bath lined with pink-veined white marble. “I legit asked Victor, ‘Are you man enough to shower in a pink bathroom?’ ” His response: “Hell, yeah.” Victor’s recording studio sits opposite the landing, while the top floor is where Jivan’s room, a library/family room, Athena’s office, and a guest room are situated.

 


See Also:

GET INSPIRED BY THESE 10 CONTEMPORARY LUXURY BEDROOMS

12 CONTEMPORARY LUXURY BATHROOMS TO INSPIRE YOUR NEXT PROJECTS


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Source: Architectural Digest

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